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01/22/2014

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Angie Diaz

My mother has a saying - we judge others by how we live. I think this is very true in Martin's case. He is a mean, vile, evil, lying, slandering idiot (I will not discredit men by calling him a man). Some day he will get what is coming to him. Do not stand too close to him lest you be struck too.

brownfield

The federal presentation of the corruption cases have in fact used the term bribes disguised as campaign contributions.

Max Powers

The feds can present how they wish, but the only reason the feds are here is because somebody liked legally questionable porn, and said person was willing to sing like a canary.

And based on that assertion, Brownfield, when a teachers' group makes a campaign contribution (and teachers' groups do make campaign contributions) to a candidate and that candidate in office "fights" for teachers and votes to increase teacher pay, you could say teachers bribed an elected official.

But that is not really the case, now is it?

The issue here is the lack of disclosure, which is what makes a bribe a bribe and NOT a campaign contribution. Bribes are not reported.


David K

Well, Brownfield is right. In one case - and one case only - a politician told a briber that he would pro quo if he would give his family member running for office some quid. The rest of the bribes were flat out cash under the table deals. So it wasn't even really as it was described.

Also - all these guys tried to claim that these were unreported camapaign contributions when the feds came knocking.

Paredes is an idiot.

Marty Schladen

Actually, I think that in several cases - Larry Medina, Willie Gandara Sr. and the Ketner information spring immediately to mind - bribes were taken or offered in the form of campaign contributions. Contributions per se are not bribes, but if prosecutors can show they were the payoff in a criminal conspiracy, they are.

David K

Marty,

Well I must stand corrected. These guys needed better lawyers because legitimate campaign donations in exchange for a vote are extremely hard to prosecute. The prosecution needs to have one of two things if not both

1. specific evidence of the "ask" in exchange for the donation. Audio, emails, smoke signals caught on video - something of that nature.

2. proof that the elected official wasn't already going to vote the way he or she did to get them in trouble.

And that's why campaign contributions in the form of bribes are usually given to stop legislation rather than start and pass it.

Max Powers

David,

You are onto something about the part about needing better attorneys. But perhaps it is not so much the attorneys themselves as much as the clients.

Lawyers are worshiped and feared in this town. This worship causes confusion. People think attorneys are priests so they "confess" to attorneys as if they were priests. I can only imagine the terrified emotional wrecks that these people when they were talking to their attorneys. We all say silly things when do not have our bearings. They THINK their attorney cares about them. The attorney does care, but that attorney cares more about his or her license than your case.

You would have thought Luther Jones would have instilled this to his circle.

With all that said, that is not to say most of those folks were not pieces of shit.

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